Monday, May 25, 2020

The Rights And Wrongs, Civil And Politics - 1630 Words

We have met here today to discuss our rights and wrongs, civil and political, and not, as some have supposed, to go into the detail of social life alone. We do not propose to petition the legislature to make our husbands just, generous, and courteous, to seat every man at the head of a cradle, and to clothe every woman in male attire. None of these points, however important they may be considered by leading men, will be touched in this convention. As to their costume, the gentlemen need feel no fear of our imitating that, for we think it in violation of every principle of taste, beauty, and dignity; notwithstanding all the contempt cast upon our loose, flowing garments, we still admire the graceful folds, and consider our costume far more artistic than theirs. Many of the nobler sex seem to agree with us in this opinion, for the bishops, priests, judges, barristers, and lord mayors of the first nation on the globe, and the Pope of Rome, with his cardinals, too, all wear the loose flowing robes, thus tacity acknowledging that the male attire is neither dignified nor imposing. No, we shall not molest you in your philosophical experiments with stocks, pants, high-heeled boots, and Russian belts. Yours be the glory to discover, by personal experience, how long the kneepan can resist the terrible strapping down which you impose, in how short time the well-developed muscles of the throat can be reduced to mere threads by the constant pressure of the stock, how high the heel of aShow MoreRelatedPolitical Influence Of The Tea Party Movement1176 Words   |  5 Pagessignificant â€Å"political actors†, â€Å"Political Party,† â€Å"Social Movement,† â€Å"Interest Group,† and â€Å"Group Organization,† which citizens in the United States can join and support in order to influence politics and government. These four important â€Å"political actors† have a long history and their ability to influence the politics and government can not be underestimated. Moreover, The Tea Party Movement is a political movement that began follow by the Barak Obama’s first presidential inauguration when his administrationRead MoreJackie Robison vs Ali Essay1640 Words   |  7 PagesJack Roosevelt â€Å"Jackie Robinson† Cassius Marcellus Clay Jr â€Å"Muhammad Ali† Muhammad Ali once said, Hating people because of their color is wrong. And it doesnt matter which color does the hating. Its just plain wrong.† Muhammad Ali stood for the common black man, so did Jackie Robinson. Both of these men were professional athletes, two different sports, baseball and boxing, were changed forever because of these men. They both broke segregation barriers not only in their profession butRead MoreThe Need For Civil Disobedience Essay1172 Words   |  5 PagesLuther King stated â€Å"Cowardice asks the question, Is it safe? Expediency asks the question, Is it politic? But conscience asks the question, Is it right? And there comes a time when one must take a position that is neither safe, nor politic, nor popular but because conscience tells one it is right.† Conscience is the main sense of human being that helps to distinguish what is wrong and what is right. Thus, conscience has to be a main driving force when people encounter unjust laws of gov ernmentRead MoreReligion and Politics in the Modern Period1215 Words   |  5 PagesWhat is distinctive about the relationship between religion and politics in the modern period? â€Å"I esteem it above all things necessary to distinguish exactly the Business of Civil government from that of religion.† As John Locke makes evident in his Letter Concerning Toleration, it is most important and fundamentally essential to define the limits of both religion and politics – their proper places in civil society. Only with government-sponsored toleration is religion allowed to prosper inRead MoreSouthern Slavery and the American Civil War Essay1667 Words   |  7 Pagesthese protesters once filled every American. However, in this instance Americans had enthusiastic, but opposing viewpoints about slavery. The North believed everything about slavery was morally wrong and that having slaves went against the American ideal of freedom. Southerners believed in their guaranteed right of property protection, and believed that the federal government taking away slavery opposed the democracy that America is also based on. When slavery re-emerged as a topic that needed to beRead MoreImmanuel Kant addresses a question often asked in political theory: the relationship between900 Words   |  4 Pagesin politics and how they ought to behave. Observers of political action recognize that political action is often a morally questionable business. Yet many of us, whether involved heavily in political action or not, have a sense that political behavior could and should be better than this. In Appendix 1 of Perpetual Peace, Kant explicates that conflict does not exist between politics and morality, because politics is an application of morality. Objectively, he argues that morality and politics areRead MorePros And Cons Of Anarchy1336 Words   |  6 Pagesstate of anarchy in politics as they view the ideal as either problematic or beneficial. Although the state of anarchy seems morally beneficial to society, ultimately government is needed to address conflict and provide order for individuals. Thomas Hobbes, a 17th century English philosopher, believed isolated individuals live in a state of war. He insisted that there is no such thing as a common power, which as a result means there is no law. Consequently, there is no right and wrong, or justice andRead MoreThe Legacy Of The Civil War1556 Words   |  7 Pagesjoined in, the impact led to shaping America’s political development. Mark A. Noll’s God and Race in American Politics, reveals the profound role of religion in American political history and in American discourse on race. Noll argues that race has been among the most influential elements in American political history, religion has always been crucial for the workings of race in American politics, and together, race and religion make up the nation’s deepest and most enduring political influence. I wasRead MorePolitics And The Federal Government961 Words   |  4 PagesThe majority of Americans have become apathetic when politics or the federal government are brought up in either the news, inside classrooms, or amongst friends and relatives. Nevertheless, people tend to have an ignorant state of mind towards politics and become so unaware about what the federal government does on a daily basis. Not to mention, Americans refuse to accept that the federal government has people working in the Senate and in the House of Representatives, recognizing and debating theirRead MoreThe aim of politics in moder politica thought1260 Words   |  6 Pagesruler or sovereign was taught to act morally in order to be successful and gain spiritual happiness; morality and politics were unified, religion played an important role in the decision making. A ruler had to act accordingly based on the standards and moral ideas of ancient civilizations and the government, this meant, recognizing that there was an absolute right and an absolute wrong. The ruler and society as a whole, in ancient times, were preoccupied with their afterlife and wanting to achieve

Thursday, May 14, 2020

How to Study in Graduate School vs College

As a graduate student, youre probably aware that applying to graduate school is very different than applying to college. Graduate programs dont care about how well rounded you are. Likewise, participation in many extracurricular activities is a boon for your college application but graduate programs prefer applicants who are focused on their work. Appreciating these differences between college and graduate school is what helped you gain admittance to graduate school. Remember and act on these differences in order to succeed as a new graduate student. Memorization skills, late night cram sessions, and last minute papers may have gotten you through college, but these habits wont help you in graduate school and instead will likely harm your success. Most students agree that graduate-level education is very different from their undergraduate experiences. Here are some of the differences.   Breadth vs. Depth Undergraduate education emphasizes general education. About one-half or more of the credits that you complete as an undergraduate fall under the heading of General Education or Liberal Arts. These courses are not in your major. Instead, they are designed to broaden your mind and provide you with a rich knowledge base of general information in literature, science, mathematics, history, and so on. Your college major, on the other hand, is your specialization. However, an undergraduate major usually provides only a broad overview of the field. Each class in your major is a discipline unto itself. For example, psychology majors may take one course each in several areas such as clinical, social, experimental, and developmental psychology. Each of these courses is a separate discipline in psychology. Although you learn a lot about your major field, in reality, your undergraduate education emphasizes breadth over depth. Graduate study entails specializing and becoming an expert in your very narrow field of study. This switch from learning a little bit about everything to becoming a professional in one area requires a different approach. Memorization vs. Analysis College students spend a great deal of time memorizing facts, definitions, lists, and formulas. In graduate school, your emphasis will change from simply recalling information to using it. Instead, youll be asked to apply what you know and analyze problems. Youll take fewer exams in graduate school and they will emphasize your ability to synthesize what you read and learn in class and critically analyze it in light of your own experience and perspective. Writing and research are the major tools of learning in graduate school. Its no longer as important to remember a specific fact as it is to know how to find it. Reporting vs Analyzing and Arguing College students often moan and groan about writing papers. Guess what? Youll write many, many papers in graduate school. Moreover, the days of simple book reports and 5 to 7 page papers on a general topic are gone. The purpose of papers in graduate school is not simply to show the professor that youve read or paid attention. Rather than simply reporting a bunch of facts, graduate school papers require you to analyze problems by applying the literature and constructing arguments that are supported by the literature. Youll move from regurgitating information to integrating it into an original argument. You will have a great deal of freedom in what you study but you will also have the difficult job of constructing clear, well-supported arguments. Make your papers work double duty by taking advantage of class paper assignments to consider dissertation ideas. Reading It All vs. Copious Skimming and Selective Reading Any student will tell you that graduate school entails a lot of reading—more than they ever imagined. Professors add lots of required readings and usually add recommended readings. Recommended readings lists can run for pages. Must you read it all? Even required reading can be overwhelming with hundreds of pages each week in some programs. Make no mistake: You will read more in graduate school than you have in your life. But you dont have to read everything, or at least not carefully. As a rule, you should carefully skim all assigned required readings at minimum and then decide which parts are the best use of your time. Read as much as you can, but read smartly. Get an idea of the overall theme of a reading assignment and then use targeted reading and note-taking to fill in your knowledge. All of these differences between undergraduate and graduate study are radical. Students who dont quickly catch on to the new expectations will find themselves at a loss in graduate school.

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

A Comparison Of Dracula By Jonathan Harker And Van Helsing

Jonathan Harker and Van Helsing are arguably the most interesting characters in the story. Jonathan is the first character in the story to encounter Dracula, and Van Helsing is the professional who assembles the band of vampire hunters. Both men are important to Dracula’s inevitable downfall, although Jonathan has more to lose since his wife is also involved in this nasty work. Jonathan Harker starts off the book with his journal of his travels to meet count Dracula, and begins to regret ever leaving home soon after. Jonathan is very observant, noting details throughout his journey; he remembers foreign words to look up, many details of the journey to the castle, and sees â€Å"a faint flickering blue flame† many times off in the distance†¦show more content†¦Van Helsing takes great care and delicacy in proving that the vampire threat is real to his companions, taking a group of men to see for themselves that Lucy had turned into evil undead. To prove to the me n that vampires are real, Van Helsing forces the men to see Lucy, whose eyes are â€Å"unclean and full of hell-fire† causing Dr. Seward to feel â€Å"the remnant of [his] love [pass] into pure hate and loathing† (Stoker 181). Van Helsing is truly brilliant, because after seeing Lucy in her state of ‘un-death’, the men are all ready to listen to him and act against the vampire threat. Van Helsing himself even admits that â€Å"at the first [he] was the sceptic† but learned to accept and deal with vampires â€Å"through long years [of training himself] to keep an open mind† (Stoker 203). Van Helsing is explaining how he is not insane, but rather more experienced and open minded. Both Jonathan Harker and Dr. Van Helsing are intriguing characters who add flavor and common sense to the story. Jonathan is naà ¯ve at first but later becomes a brave caring protector when he joins the band of vampire hunters. Van Helsing is the wise veteran that eve ryone looks to for help. In the end, the two emerge victorious over the evil that had plagued them for so long. Conclusion Abraham Stoker was an interesting writer who stayed loyal to his friends even after achievingShow MoreRelatedThe Different Adaptations of Dracula 1660 Words   |  7 Pagesown purpose, and in doing so generates another version of Dracula. Count Dracula has become an infamous character in history, and has been captured in many different mediums, such as the Japanese anime and manga series Vampire Hunter D, which follows Draculas son D in his adventures (Kikuchi). However, one of the adaptations that endures in modern minds is the 1992 film by Francis Ford Coppola, Bram Stokers Dracula. This version of Dracula was meant to be loyal to the novel, but it diverged fromRead MoreCompare/Contrast of Bram Stokers Dracula and Polidoris the Vampyre1987 Words   |  8 PagesComparison and Contrast of Bram Stoker’s Dracula and Polidori’s The Vampyre While Bram Stoker’s Dracula and Polidori’s The Vampyre share some minor details, mostly regarding the basics of vampires and the location and date in which the stories take place, the majority of the stories differ greatly. The Vampyre was published almost a hundred years earlier, so it is easy to see how some details of that story can be seen in Dracula. Bram Stoker no doubt must have used The Vampyre as an influenceRead MoreDracula s Power : The Weaknesses Of The East During Great Britain s Most Powerful Era1472 Words   |  6 PagesDracula’s overwhelming supernatural power is first introduced by Jonathan Harker as he witnesses the â€Å"swept [of] his long arms, as though brushing aside some impalpable obstacle, the wolves fell back and back further still† (20). Knowing that Dracula can command wolves at his will, will send chills down anyone’s spine if they have to make Dracula their enemy. Bram Stoker created a monster that possesses a wi de range of powers like: commanding wolves and rats, transformation into animal forms andRead MoreSocietal Dilemmas Of Frankenstein And Frankenstein1541 Words   |  7 Pagesmatters allows them to be timeless classics and provoke different reactions from different eras. This is due to the substance of the Gothic novels, and how the authors were often not afraid to address societal dilemmas. Frankenstein by Mary Shelley and Dracula by Bram Stoker are two examples of this. Mary Shelly uses Frankenstein’s monster as a metaphorical figure to demonstrate the treatment of the marginalised. This is clarified through the Monster’s declarative â€Å"All men hate the wretched;† referringRead More Comparing The Lost Boys, Dracula and Peter-Pan Essay3008 Words   |  13 Pagesin The Lost Boys, Dracula and Peter-Pan  Ã‚  Ã‚     Ã‚  Ã‚   In The Lost Boys there are similar occurrences and references to both of the novel Dracula, by Bram Stoker and Peter Pan, by Sir James Barrie. There are many similarities between the three story lines. In the stories of all three works there is a common thread of story it all started with Dracula. The story of Dracula has many components of it used in the film The Lost Boys. The comparison’s begin with the vampire. Dracula is centered aroundRead MoreThe Novel Dracula By Bram Stoker2614 Words   |  11 Pages The book Dracula by Abraham Stoker is filled with many intriguing topics and themes such as sexuality and gender. These topics and the way they are addressed in the book were very controversial when published on May 26, 1897 and were seen as scandalous by its readers. Through this book, Bram Stoker made the idea of vampires become a relevant part of popular culture as it is today and allowed them to be interpreted as figures symbolizing sex and the transference of disease. During Stoker s eraRead MoreThe Angel Of The House1756 Words   |  8 Pageshelp are not designated for her own sake, but for her husband and his venture. Mina says herself before Dracula comes into her life that â€Å"[she] [has] been working very hard lately, because [she] [wants] to keep up with Jonathan’s studies [and when they] are married [she] shall be able to be useful to Jonathan† (Stoker 53). Even before Dracula’s threat becomes imminent, she works only to help Jonathan and not for herself (Mai 30). Through this analysis, it seems as Mina’s work i n organising the text isRead MoreEssay about bram stokers dracula1424 Words   |  6 Pagespeople are familiar with the novel Dracula, by Bram Stoker. It is typically referred to as a horror story sure to give a good scare. However, Bram Stoker was not merely out to give his Victorian audience a thrill ride. Many symbols and themes, particularly those of the main antagonist Dracula, were brought into the novel to teach a lesson. Oddly enough, Dracula resembles other forces of evil in other religions as well. A strong comparison exists between Dracula, Satan, and Hindu demons. Of courseRead MoreBram Stoker s Dracula And Richard Matheson s I Am Legend2160 Words   |  9 Pagesexplaining difficult concepts of good and evil, science and religion. In Bram Stoker’s Dracula and Richard Matheson’s I Am Legend, the mythical horror creatures, the vampires, have many differences in their mythical abilities, functionality and origin; however, they both serve to underline themes that remind the reader of what makes us human and what defines us as ultimately good or evil. Stoker’s Count Dracula is the product of a religious strike against the antagonist whereas the vampires in I AmRead MoreAnalysis Of Walt Whitman s Dracula And Bram Stoker s `` Dracula ``1886 Words   |  8 Pagesyoung adults, had become advocates of the controversial topics Whitman wrote about. Wilde and Stoker’s writing styles differ from Whitman’s: Wilde is known for his involvement with the Aestheticism movement and Stoker for his classic horror novel, Dracula. Both men have personally met Whitman on multiple occasions in his last aging years when he lived in New Jersey, which shows a direct relation, however Whitman s influence can be seen within the topics and themes the writers portrayed in their own

Tuesday, May 5, 2020

Business Ethics and Sustainability Responsibility

Question: Discuss about the Business Ethics and Sustainability Responsibility. Answer: Introduction Kemper et al. (2013) states that Corporate Social Responsibility plays a crucial role in the betterment of the organization as it helps inbringing benefits regarding risk management, customer relationships, cost savings, innovation capacity and human resource management. Graafland and Mazereeuw-Van der Duijn Schouten (2012) also adds that CSR promotes the organizations approach towards the social and environmental responsibility. In this assignment, Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) activity is analyzed of Westpac, which is an Australian bank having one of the largest branch networks and has been listed on the 2013 Worlds Most Ethical (WME) Companies list. They serve 13.1 million customers with 1429 branches and a network of 3850 ATMs ("Westpac.com.au", 2016). They took initiatives for women empowerment, reduction in carbon emissions and associated with NGOs. Discussion In this section, the CSR implemented by the organization will be analyzed to discuss whether the company meets their economic, legal, ethical and philanthropic obligation. Figure 1: Pyramid of Corporate Social Responsibility (Source: Arnold Valentin, 2013) Philanthropic Serving the un-served- Westpac being a leading finance organization, they offer help in financial literacy and awareness among community along with the financial education to the children, who desire to serve their best in this sector (Arnold Valentin, 2013). Collaboration- They also collaborated with many NSO and housing sectors and take initiatives to support 100 students each year forever for setting a new benchmark in corporate philanthropy. They also help in charity work for old-age homes, orphanage and academic institution. Ethical Responsible, prudent lending, risk management- Westpac ethically follows all their business approach through corporate governance framework. Lanis and Richardson (2012) depicts that with this framework they perform their financial; auditing, risk and compliances, nominations, remuneration and technology. Figure 2: Governance framework of Westpac (Source: "Westpac.com.au", 2016) Fair and transparent financial services- Westpac handles the customer complaint before any other business procedure as they intend to serve for the betterment of the organization to provide a better life for the community. They also have Westpac Group Securities Trading Policy that prohibits from dealing in any securities with any stakeholders. Reduction in greenhouse emission- This context handles the Triple Bottom Line procedure that signifies their Westpac sustainability strategy. They have taken initiatives for an environmental solution as the baseline of their electricity efficiency in commercial and retail sites in 2012 was 202 kWh/m2 which they target to reduce up to 18 kWh/m2 ("Westpac.com.au", 2016). Moreover, Cornwall (2015) also affirms that Westpac taken steps for reducing the Scope 1 2 GHG emissions in commercial and retail sites from 141,726 tonnes CO2-e to 121,884 tonnes CO2-e. Figure 3: Westpac Sustainability Strategy (Source: "Westpac.com.au", 2016) Legal Banking regulations- All banks in Australia formulated under Reserve Bank Act 1995 and the concerned organization followed all the banking and financial obligation like- Australian Prudential Regulation Authority Act 1998, Privacy Act 1988, Cheques Act 1986 and State Fair Trading Acts like Fair Trading Act 1999 ("Federal Register of Legislation", 2016). Economic Westpac continuously takes proficient steps for making more profit so that the nations economy can be improved. Logue and Zappala (2014) highlights that in 2015 they earned an annual revenue of A$ 2,788 billion which is 8% higher than 2014. Moreover, their good performance results in lending up of 12% and customer revenue up by 2% that ensures that there will be fewer chances of depletions and financial crisis. As a result, no employee will lose their jobs ("Westpac.com.au", 2016). Conclusion Thus, it can be concluded that Westpac met their economic, legal, ethical and philanthropic obligation and continued to be the most sustainable organization as they are already the number one in rank according to World Economic Forum. Reference List Arnold, D. G., Valentin, A. (2013). Corporate social responsibility at the base of the pyramid.Journal of business research,66(10), 1904-1914. Cornwall, A. (2015). Cautious optimism on emissions reduction.Australian Environmental Law Digest,2(2), 26. Federal Register of Legislation - Australian Government. (2016).Legislation.gov.au. Retrieved 16 September 2016, from https://www.legislation.gov.au/Series/C2004A00310 Graafland, J., Mazereeuw-Van der Duijn Schouten, C. (2012). Motives for corporate social responsibility.De Economist,160(4), 377-396. Kemper, J., Schilke, O., Reimann, M., Wang, X., Brettel, M. (2013). Competition-motivated corporate social responsibility.Journal of Business Research,66(10), 1954-1963. Lanis, R., Richardson, G. (2012). Corporate social responsibility and tax aggressiveness: a test of legitimacy theory.Accounting, Auditing Accountability Journal,26(1), 75-100. Logue, D., Zappala, G. (2014). The Emergence of the Social Economy: the Australian not-for-profit sector in transition. Westpac - Personal, Business and Corporate Banking. (2016).Westpac.com.au. Retrieved 16 September 2016, from https://www.westpac.com.au/.

Thursday, April 9, 2020

Ritalin Abuse an Example of the Topic Health Essays by

Ritalin Abuse The pharmaceutical industry, working with the government and organized psychiatry, claim that such drugs as Ritalin, are a safe "treatment" for ADHD. School systems and courts have pressured and even forced parents to give stimulant drugs to their children. But hidden behind the well-oiled public relations machine is a potentially devastating reality. The problem with ADHD or ADD is already not whether or not ADHD is a subtype of ADD, but rather the problem is whether or not we should be medicating our children with drugs such as Ritalin. Need essay sample on "Ritalin Abuse" topic? We will write a custom essay sample specifically for you Proceed Questions like the following often arise when discussing the issue: Are the side effects worth getting our children under control? Are all the children who are on Ritalin on it for just cause or are the drugs being abused? What does the future hold for these children who are using Ritalin and other stimulants? All these questions leave a lot parents wondering if they should put there young child on medications and what it will do to their future. Millions of children are prescribed the stimulant drugs such as Ritalin, Adderall, Concerta and Metadate for Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) in the hope of controlling behaviors described as hyperactivity, impulsivity and inattention. These medications decrease restlessness, improve attention span, increase the ability to focus, decrease aggressive outbursts and improve social interaction. They are thought to work by adjusting the brain's chemical balance and reversing under-arousal, possibly by increasing the availability of certain neurotransmitters. About 75 % of children with ADHD respond well to stimulant medication with improved attention at school and increased academic productivity (Kidd, 2000). Ritalin, the most commonly prescribed stimulant for ADHD, peaks 1 to 2 hours after it's taken and effects last about 4 hours. For maximum benefit it's taken three times a day, seven days a week - in order to sustain home as well as school interactions. (Some find that although the afternoon dose eases home relationships, it may exacerbate side effects such as poor appetite and insomnia.) A slow-release form taken in the morning may last the day (at least 6 to 8 hours). A few develop "drug tolerance" and need increasing doses to suppress symptoms. (High amounts may have some growth-retarding effect, requring a drug change.) Side effects of Ritalin can include headaches, insomnia, reduced appetite and weight loss, stomach aches, occasional tics (grimaces, nail biting), a "zombie-like" stare, obsessive "over-focussing" (becoming over-engrossed) and emotional "constriction" (for instance shown by drawings where everything is miniscule or shoved tightly into a corner). Omitting the 4 p.m. dose might overcome the sleep problems but at the cost of disrupting home and family life. Most side effects can be avoided by giving smaller doses. Some children object to the "roller-coaster" feeling while on the drug, and want to feel "normal" again, leading to a drop-off in drug-taking. Some hate the idea of having their behaviour "controlled;" and some parents oppose the idea of "mind-altering" drugs for their kids (Kidd, 2000, p.20). In any case, there are always some ideals that do persuade parents into giving their children stimulants. The one of the appeals, and usually a selfish one, is that the drug gets their child under control. Parents who are fed up with their child and their behavior think that there is no other way of getting their child to behave and automatically look for a drug to get the situation changed sometimes when the child hasn't even been diagnosed with disorder yet. The appeal greatens when guilt settles in. Parents sometimes feel responsible for their child's outbreaks and by giving him or her a drug it makes the parents feel as if something chemically is wrong, and isn't because of the child's upbringing (Brink, 2004). But there are more reasonable and positive motives for using Ritalin for children with ADHD. A study was done by the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), which proved that children with ADHD and taking medication to relieve symptoms had a better chance of not dropping out school, not smoking, abusing alcohol and drugs, or going to prison compared to those who with the disorder but are not on drugs (Brink, 2004). An experiment that was also done by NIMH seemed to further strengthen the belief that Ritalin does indeed work, is necessary, and leaves us with few alternatives. This experiment, which was conducted for fourteen months and involved 576 children, gave evidence that psychological therapy does not have a significant impact on children with ADHD and that drugs had a far bigger change in the children's behavior and lessened the symptoms more than therapy (Brink, 2004). Besides short-term benefits for Ritalin, some studies show that there are some long-term ones as well. In 1988 scientists found improvements in cognitive functions in reading performances. Though it wasn't positive, and is also very controversial if the drug itself was creating the improvement or if it was the drugs ability to reduce the disorders symptoms, which helps the child focus, but in the end, there still was an obvious increase in learning. Though frustration of child obedience, previously mention guilt, and hope for better grades often play a vital role in the decision of whether or not to put one's child on medication, there are some outstanding negatives that also make an impact on parents' choices on the matter. One of the major problems with Ritalin is the side effects the medication causes its users. As mentioned before, these include effects as minor as stomach pains, sleep loss, loss or appetite and irritability. But side effects can be as serious as facial tics, anxiety, insomnia, and depression. (Hancock and Wingert, 1996) Other sever symptoms include increase in blood pressure, nausea, hypersensitivity, and temporary decrease in bone growth (White and Rouge, 2003). In February of 1996, the Food and Drug Administration released a study done on mice that showed that Ritalin might even have the ability to cause a liver cancer (Hancock and Wingert, 1996). Also, in relation to side effects, is a lawsuit that took place in 2000 in California and New Jersey. Parents sued the American Psychiatric Association (APA) and Novartis Pharmaceutical Corporation for "failed to advise potential consumers... of the nature and extent of potential side effects... despite information in medical and scientific literature concerning these side effects of Ritalin use." The side effects that are being referred to are cardiovascular, central nervous system and gastrointestinal problems. The suit also investigated teachers who persuaded parents to take their children to doctors who where known for giving children Ritalin (School Law News, 2000, p.1). It is being feared by many physicians that Ritalin is being overly prescribed to children. Some doctors are seeing patients that have been told to have ADHD, but in reality have other problems such as learning difficulties or depression. Parents often even ask doctors for Ritalin, even when their child does not have a need for it, but the child's parents want to see his or her grades rise. Some doctors even admit to giving children the drug without doing much background checking of the child or any psychological tests that may prove the child has other problems. (Hancock and Wingert, 1996). ADHD is diagnosed without much hoop jumping. There are sixteen different symptoms that ADHD is connected with, and if the child has eight of them then all too often he or she is automatically considered to have ADHD; often without taking any other disorders or problems into consideration such as anxiety or depression (Donnelly, 1998). It seems as though parents are able to get their children the drug almost at demand. If they feel their child is in need of the stimulant, there is little stopping them from receiving it. Skepticism of ADHD and stimulants continue getting more serious when taking in some of the statistics. One fact that may change someone's thoughts on the disorder is that 8 in 10 children with ADHD are boys (Donnelly, 1998) But does anyone put into consideration that girls develop and become mature faster than boys? Or is it being forgotten that kids are just kids and are not always going to act as teachers and parents desire? Another issue relating to Ritalin is the possibilities of unknown long-term effects that have not yet been discovered. There have not been any long-term studies done on children who have taken Ritalin. Since ADHD cannot be tested by blood tests or any other kind of testing, there is always the chance that children are being misdiagnosed and receiving stimulants for a disorder that they do not have (Hancock and Wingert, 1996). Children sometimes have symptoms that seem like ADHD but aren't at all. The child can have problems such as chronic fear, mild seizures or even chronic ear infections, all of which may make adults assume the child has the disorder, but in reality has something completely different. Often problems at home make children act up as well. There maybe an abusive parent at home that makes a child be difficult in the classroom. In cases like these the child is not in need of drugs, but needs counseling (White and Rouge, 2003). Another negative aspect of the drug is the abuse of it. Because of the increase in prescribing Ritalin, the number of high school and college students abusing the drug has also increased. The drug is often bought from other students who are either on the drug or whose brother or sisters are. Ritalin is used by it's abuses by either being snorted or injected which gives the user a six hour mellow high, often compared to the high that cocaine gives. On college campus, sixteen percent of students questioned admitted that they had used Ritalin in an illegal way. Because of the number of abusers has increased so quickly, the country of Sweden has withdrawn Ritalin from the country completely (White and Rouge, 2003) The concept of ADHD and its medications are really hard to justify. There are some very valid reasons for putting children on the drug, especially helping them pay attention in school and having the same opportunity as the rest of the children in their classes. But the side effects are just mind boggling. I think even the slightest chance of some of these side effects mentioned would want parents to search for alternatives for their children and keep them away from the drug. Another problem about ADHD is the fact that doctors cannot find anything psychically different from the children diagnosed with the disease from those that are "normal." Dr. Thomas Millar, a retired Vancouver child psychiatrist, goes as far as to say that ADHD is a "mythical disorder"(Donnelly, 1998, p. 2). He also says that the problem is not hyper children, but rather its poor parenting. Children that act as children do- easily excited, short attention spans, and hyper (all symptoms of ADHD)- are not considered to be acting as normal children, but rather as children with a disorder. I think Dr. Millar put it best when he said, "If Tom Sawyer was around today, he'd be Ritalin, as would any other normal boy in literature. Today, parents don't have any idea of what child behavior ought to be." Parents who start giving their children this drug at ages as earlier as two, I think, are looking for quick fix and are being lazy. How can parent decide that a two year old is being hyperactive (White and Rouge, 2003)? Most two year olds are active and have little to no attention spans. I think this only teaches children that drugs are the answer to all our problems. By putting a child on a mind altering drug at such a young age, when he or she has not even started school yet, it leaves a parent with very little evidence or reason for their action. The child does not have schoolwork yet, and has little need for paying attention for long periods of time, so what does this child need the drug for? Because the child is difficult and more active than a parent wishes? It almost seems as if parents want to change their child's personality and make their childhood less interesting. I think it's very important that parents do not view Ritalin as the first and only way of calming their child down. All in all, Ritalin is a very controversial drug in our country because of its side effects and the insecurities of diagnosing ADHD. The drug carries very important help for children who are struggling to pay attention and without a doubt do have a disorder. But the number of children who are on the drug for the wrong reason is a scary thought. Are we become so impatient with our children that we do not want to take the time to discipline or help them through their problems? Have our children become so bad that we are willing to risk their health so they calm down and do not embarrass us? Our society needs to learn more about this drug that too many of us are so quickly giving to our children. References Brink, Susan. (2004, Apr. 26).Doing Ritalin Right. U.S. News & World Report, 125 (20), 76. Dalsgaard, S. et al. (2001). Reassessment of ADHD in a Historical Cohort of Children Treated with Stimulants in the Period 1969-1989. European Child & Adolescent Psychiatry 10, 230-239. Donnelly, Patrick. (1998, June 15). How to Fix Tom Sawyer. Ablerta Report/Newsmagazine, 25 (26), 32. Hancock, LynNell and Pat Wingert. (1996, Feb 18). Mother's Little Helper. Newsweek, 127(12), 50. Kidd, Parris M. (2000, Sep/Oct). ADHD total health management. The safe and effective alternative to Ritalin. Total Health, 22 (5). Lawsuits Say Drug Company Hyped Kids' Need For Ritalin. (2000, Sept. 29). School Law News, 28 (20), 1-2. White, Hazel L. and Baton Rouge. (Winter 2003). Ritalin Update for Counselors, Teachers, and Parents. Education 124 (3).

Monday, March 9, 2020

Free Essays on Learning Organizations

The Need for the â€Å"LEARNING ORGANIZATION† The nature of the environment has changed dramatically due to significant economic, social and technological changes over the past decades. Organizations today are confronted with increasing environmental turbulence arising from global competition, the introduction of new technologies, shortened product lifecycles and political and social pressures. Organizations, today must be flexible and learn to anticipate changes and respond rapidly. Today, learning makes the critical difference among organizations. Learning can hardly be described as a new characteristic of organizations. Organizational learning is as old as organizations themselves. What is new, is an increased awareness of the connections between learning and competitive ability as well as better insight into the conditions for effective learning. In the long term it is said that learning will only provide competitive advantage to organizations that learn faster and better than their competitors. Changes in the business environment have significant implications for learning and its role: What is a Learning Organization? A learning organization is one that seeks to create its own future; that assumes learning is an ongoing and creative process for its members; and that develops, adapts and transforms itself in response to the needs and aspirations of people, both inside and outside itself. At the heart of learning organization stands the belief that enormous human potential lies locked, undeveloped in the organizations. Central to this belief is the convinction that when all members of an organization fully develop and exercise their essential human capacities, the resulting congruence between personal and organizational visions, goals and objectives will release this potential. Peter Senge, known as Mr. Learning Organization, defines the learning organization as the organization â€Å" in which you cannot not learn because ... Free Essays on Learning Organizations Free Essays on Learning Organizations The Need for the â€Å"LEARNING ORGANIZATION† The nature of the environment has changed dramatically due to significant economic, social and technological changes over the past decades. Organizations today are confronted with increasing environmental turbulence arising from global competition, the introduction of new technologies, shortened product lifecycles and political and social pressures. Organizations, today must be flexible and learn to anticipate changes and respond rapidly. Today, learning makes the critical difference among organizations. Learning can hardly be described as a new characteristic of organizations. Organizational learning is as old as organizations themselves. What is new, is an increased awareness of the connections between learning and competitive ability as well as better insight into the conditions for effective learning. In the long term it is said that learning will only provide competitive advantage to organizations that learn faster and better than their competitors. Changes in the business environment have significant implications for learning and its role: What is a Learning Organization? A learning organization is one that seeks to create its own future; that assumes learning is an ongoing and creative process for its members; and that develops, adapts and transforms itself in response to the needs and aspirations of people, both inside and outside itself. At the heart of learning organization stands the belief that enormous human potential lies locked, undeveloped in the organizations. Central to this belief is the convinction that when all members of an organization fully develop and exercise their essential human capacities, the resulting congruence between personal and organizational visions, goals and objectives will release this potential. Peter Senge, known as Mr. Learning Organization, defines the learning organization as the organization â€Å" in which you cannot not learn because ... Free Essays on Learning Organizations The Need for the â€Å"LEARNING ORGANIZATION† The nature of the environment has changed dramatically due to significant economic, social and technological changes over the past decades. Organizations today are confronted with increasing environmental turbulence arising from global competition, the introduction of new technologies, shortened product lifecycles and political and social pressures. Organizations, today must be flexible and learn to anticipate changes and respond rapidly. Today, learning makes the critical difference among organizations. Learning can hardly be described as a new characteristic of organizations. Organizational learning is as old as organizations themselves. What is new, is an increased awareness of the connections between learning and competitive ability as well as better insight into the conditions for effective learning. In the long term it is said that learning will only provide competitive advantage to organizations that learn faster and better than their competitors. Changes in the business environment have significant implications for learning and its role: What is a Learning Organization? A learning organization is one that seeks to create its own future; that assumes learning is an ongoing and creative process for its members; and that develops, adapts and transforms itself in response to the needs and aspirations of people, both inside and outside itself. At the heart of learning organization stands the belief that enormous human potential lies locked, undeveloped in the organizations. Central to this belief is the convinction that when all members of an organization fully develop and exercise their essential human capacities, the resulting congruence between personal and organizational visions, goals and objectives will release this potential. Peter Senge, known as Mr. Learning Organization, defines the learning organization as the organization â€Å" in which you cannot not learn because ...

Saturday, February 22, 2020

REPORT ON AMAZON.COM Coursework Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 2500 words

REPORT ON AMAZON.COM - Coursework Example Ð fter thiÃ'•, it will exÐ °mine thÐ µ prÐ ¾ceÃ'•Ã'• tÐ ¾ mÐ °ke Ð ° Ã'•trÐ °tegic mÐ °rketing plÐ °n thÐ °t Ã'•tÐ °rtÃ'• with miÃ'•Ã'•iÐ ¾n Ã'•tÐ °tement. FinÐ °lly, thÐ µre will be Ð °n Ð °nÐ °lyÃ'•iÃ'• Ð ¾f hÐ ¾w tÐ ¾ cÐ ¾ntrÐ ¾l thÐ µ plÐ °n Ð °nd implement it. ThÐ µ repÐ ¾rt uÃ'•eÃ'• thÐ µ cÐ ¾mpÐ °ny Ð mÐ °zÐ ¾n .cÐ ¾m tÐ ¾ develÐ ¾p thÐ µ Ã'•trÐ °tegic mÐ °rketing plÐ °n. Ð mÐ °zÐ ¾n.cÐ ¾m iÃ'• thÐ µ lÐ °rgeÃ'•t Ð ¾nline retÐ °iler. ThÐ µ cÐ ¾mpÐ °ny Ð ¾pened itÃ'• virtuÐ °l dÐ ¾Ã ¾rÃ'• in July 1995 by Jeff BezÐ ¾Ã'• in Ð…eÐ °ttle. Ð…ince thÐ µn it hÐ °Ã'• enjÐ ¾yed rÐ °pid expÐ °nÃ'•iÐ ¾n in Ð °ll Ð °Ã'•pectÃ'• Ð ¾f itÃ'• Ð ¾perÐ °tiÐ ¾nÃ'•, including buÃ'•ineÃ'•Ã'• turnÐ ¾ver, Ð °nd Ð ° Ã'•pectÐ °culÐ °r riÃ'•e in Ã'•hÐ °re vÐ °lue Ã'•ince public flÐ ¾Ã °tÐ °tiÐ ¾n in 1997. Ð mÐ °zÐ ¾n.cÐ ¾m Ã'•ellÃ'• Ð ¾nly Ð ¾n-line Ð °nd iÃ'• eÃ'•Ã'•entiÐ °lly Ð °n infÐ ¾rmÐ °tiÐ ¾n brÐ ¾ker. Ð mÐ °zÐ ¾n.cÐ ¾m hÐ °Ã'• cÐ ¾nÃ'•tÐ °ntly grÐ ¾wing dÐ °tÐ °bÐ °Ã'•e Ð ¾f Ð ¾ver 12 milliÐ ¾n cuÃ'•tÐ ¾merÃ'• in mÐ ¾re thÐ °n 160 cÐ ¾untrieÃ'•. Ð mÐ °zÐ ¾n.cÐ ¾m iÃ'• thÐ µ plÐ °ce tÐ ¾ find Ð °nd diÃ'•cÐ ¾ver Ð °nything cuÃ'•tÐ ¾merÃ'• wÐ °nt tÐ ¾ buy Ð ¾nline. (BeÃ'•t, 2000, 21) ThÐ µy hÐ °ve eÐ °rthÃ'• biggeÃ'•t Ã'•electiÐ ¾n Ð ¾f prÐ ¾ductÃ'•, including milliÐ ¾nÃ'• Ð ¾f bÐ ¾Ã ¾kÃ'•, free electrÐ ¾nic greeting cÐ °rdÃ'•, Ð ¾nline Ð °uctiÐ ¾nÃ'•, videÐ ¾Ã'•, CDÃ'•, DVDÃ'•, tÐ ¾yÃ'•, gÐ °meÃ'•, electrÐ ¾nicÃ'•, kitchenwÐ °re, cÐ ¾mputerÃ'•, Ð °nd mÐ ¾re. Ð mÐ °zÐ ¾n trÐ °nÃ'•fÐ ¾rmed itÃ'•elf frÐ ¾m Ð ° Ã'•peciÐ °lty retÐ °iler intÐ ¾ Ð °n Ð ¾nline Ã'•hÐ ¾pping pÐ ¾rtÐ °l, tÐ °king Ð ° cue frÐ ¾m Ð °uctiÐ ¾neer eBÐ °y, which Ã'•et itÃ'•elf up Ð °Ã'• Ð ° mediÐ °tÐ ¾r between buyer Ð °nd Ã'•eller. It Ã'•tÐ °rted Ã'•elling prÐ ¾ductÃ'• frÐ ¾m cÐ ¾mpÐ °nieÃ'• Ã'•uch Ð °Ã'• TÐ ¾yÃ'• "R" UÃ'• Ð °nd TÐ °rget Ð ¾n itÃ'• Web Ã'•ite. It Ð °dded merchÐ °ndiÃ'•e frÐ ¾m Ã'•mÐ °ller retÐ °ilerÃ'• in itÃ'• zÐ…hÐ ¾pÃ'•. Ð nd it cÐ ¾mpeted directly with eBÐ °y thrÐ ¾ugh itÃ'• Ð mÐ °zÐ ¾n Ð uctiÐ ¾nÃ'•. ThÐ µ firÃ'•t phÐ °Ã'•e Ð ¾f plÐ °nning Ã'•trÐ °tegic mÐ °rketing plÐ °n iÃ'• tÐ ¾ define thÐ µ buÃ'•ineÃ'•Ã'• miÃ'•Ã'•iÐ ¾n. Ð Ã'• (CrÐ °venÃ'•, 2003, 198) Ã'•tÐ °teÃ'• BuÃ'•ineÃ'•Ã'• miÃ'•Ã'•iÐ ¾n iÃ'• Ð ° brÐ ¾Ã °dly